blog: news + information from “the home authority”

Inspiring Innovation: An Interview with Susan Yashinsky, Sphere Trending

February 19th, 2015

By Vicki Matranga, Design Programs Coordinator

Learn how to develop and launch the right products for the right customer—with the right methods! Be sure to attend some of the free executive-level educational sessions at the Innovation Theater. These programs will give you a fresh perspective as you walk the Show and will inspire, inform and improve your business.

The four days of the 2015 International Home + Housewares Show will be packed with events and educational sessions. To help you plan your valuable time at the Show, we preview the 21 presentations that will take place in the Innovation Theater in the Lakeside Center. Don’t miss the chance to meet the speakers in person and the opportunity to ask questions relevant to your work. All programs are audio-recorded and will be available on www.housewares.org after the Show.

The New Personality of Home and Retail

Monday, March 9 9:30 —10:20 p.m.

Innovation Theater, Lakeside Center, Room E350Susan Yashinsky Photograph (resize)

Today we are speaking with Susan Yashinsky, vice president of innovation trends for Sphere Trending. For more than 25 years, Susan has seen the future of emerging trends. She has been with Sphere Trending for 12 years and leads the macro division for consumer and retail trend insights. Earlier in her career, she was a head merchant for home products for a major retailer and also spent many years in marketing and market research. Susan is a frequent speaker at conferences and also a featured blogger for Builder magazine.

Susan, what is the most exciting or rewarding part of your job?

I am fortunate to work for a company that lives in the future, studying macro and design influences and trends, yet needs to apply these insights to the present for innovative solutions for clients. My passion is inspired by the people I work with, great conferences throughout the year, books, articles and this exciting era we are living in which is largely defined by the quick pace of change.

In the past few years, what has changed most in your business? How has your company met these challenges in the way you do your work?

The biggest change for our business is the breadth of industries we are working in. We started with an expertise in home environments but now that all environments are becoming like a home – education, commercial interiors, hospitality, retail, transportation – we are applying these insights to more types of business entities. In addition, with so much information available online, companies look to trend firms such as ours to be relevant curators for meaningful implications.

Why did you choose to speak at the International Home + Housewares Show?

This Show is a great forum for a manufacturers and retailers to come together to inspire each other, as well as showcase the home evolution that is driving so much of consumer expenditures.

Tell us what you will be speaking about and how and this topic is important for Show audiences.

In “The New Personality of Home & Retail” we will provide a 21st century outlook on the evolution of residential and retail spaces, with a strong emphasis on the role of design in meeting the consumer needs of today. Attendees will see examples of inspiring spaces along with strategic connections to tie the needs of the consumer to the environments in which we reside and shop in a way that is actionable for future growth; validated by key macro drivers of society and technology.

Susan, your programs in the Innovation Theater always draw a big audience. What are you looking forward to most from speaking there this year?

I love speaking at the Innovation Theater as there is always a strong mix of attendees from various backgrounds and the energetic audience brings thoughtful questions and discussion.

What do you see as consumers’ biggest concerns regarding housewares products?

The biggest concern is how to find solutions that enhance our lives. Consumers are looking for inspiring products that actually serve a relevant purpose. In this new economic era, we buy for meaning and consumption is very considered.

What are some of today’s trends or issues that new product development professionals and/or retailers face in the housewares market?

The challenges include modest economic growth, a strapped middle class, a glut of meaningless line extensions and an overstored retail sector that is almost overwhelming in the amount of choices available.

Thank you, Susan, for giving us a peek at your presentation. It’s sure to be thought-provoking, as your programs are every year. We look forward to your annual interpretation of lifestyles today and where trends are heading. Be sure to be in the audience in the Innovation Theater, Lakeside Center room E350 on Monday, March 9 at 9:30 am.

sphere logo 640x480

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact Susan to learn more about her work:

Susan Yashinsky syashinsky@spheretrending.com

Sphere Trending: www.spheretrending.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SphereTrending

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/spheretrending/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SphereTrending

Slideshare: http://slideshare.net/spheretrending

Inspiring Innovation: An Interview with Jasmin Reese and Mobolaji Akintunde, Retail Branding and Design

February 19th, 2015

By Vicki Matranga, Design Programs Coordinator

Learn how to develop and launch the right products for the right customer—with the right methods! Be sure to attend some of the free executive-level educational sessions at the Innovation Theater. These programs will give you a fresh perspective as you walk the Show and will inspire, inform and improve your business.

The four days of the 2015 International Home + Housewares Show will be packed with events and educational sessions. To help you plan your valuable time at the Show, we preview the 21 presentations that will take place in the Innovation Theater in the Lakeside Center. Don’t miss the chance to meet the speakers in person and the opportunity to ask questions relevant to your work. All programs are audio-recorded and will be available on www.housewares.org after the Show.

Shine the Light on Your Brand: Retail Design

Tuesday, March 10 10:30—11:20 a.m.

Innovation Theater, Lakeside Center, Room E350

Jasmin ReeseGet acquainted with Jasmin Reese and Mobolaji Akintude. Jasmin is an Allied Member of the American Society of Interior Design. She designs with a classic and traditional sensibility that is at the same time fresh and full of color. Jasmin worked in Rhode Island as an interior design consultant at high-end design houses, as well as Boston and Chicago as a lighting consultant. She has a bachelor degree in art from Rhode Island College, studied at the Boston Architectural Center and an associate degree from Harrington College of Design. From 2010 to July 2014, Jasmin was one half of Cadmium Interiors, a full-service interior design firm, before establishing her own office. An avid painter, her art informs her design cMobolaji_headshothoices in composition, scale, and color.

Mobolaji Akintunde is a branding and marketing consultant whose management and leadership skills, compelling ideas and strategic flair have produced breakthrough results for Fortune 500 and globally recognized brands. He is also co-founder and chief brand officer of the luxury lifestyle brand, Stache & Hyde — www.stacheandhyde.com.

Jasmin and Mobolaji, what is the most exciting or rewarding part of your work? What inspires your passions?

Jasmin: The most exciting part of my job is collaborating with a client or a person in the trades to come up with creative, custom solutions that inspire others. In my work, artwork, textiles, lighting and old buildings play a huge role in how I think about interiors.

Mobolaji: The most exciting part of my job is working with my clients to develop a succinct brand framework that communicates clearly and effectively with their customers. I am most inspired when my clients create a vision and a mission for their brand. It is amazing to see their reaction when they fully get who they are and why their business is in existence.

In the past few years, what has changed most in your business? How has your company met these challenges in the way you work?

Jasmin: In the past few years, clients have already done a lot of research on their own before working with me. They are looking online at sites like Houzz and Pinterest. This is a good thing, however, many people who watch home decorating shows think that some of the rooms they see can be done on an unrealistic budget. It is my role to educate clients on what good design costs, and show them the value of dollars spent.

Mobolaji: In the past few years I have noticed that more and more companies are interested in their brand and are taking steps to better define it. In light of this increasing awareness, I have begun to network extensively to establish new relationships and better vet potential clients with a brand profile report.

Why did you choose to speak at the International Home + Housewares Show?

Jasmin: I chose to speak at the IHA Show to share my knowledge of lighting and how it can impact your space. I have partnered with branding expert Mobolaji Akintunde because we work well together when presenting an idea to a broad audience.

Mobolaji: I agree with what Jasmin said.

Tell us what you will be speaking about and how this topic is important for Show audiences.

Mobolaji: In this workshop we will be shining the light (so to speak) on how lighting in your establishment plays a major role in how your customers shop. There’s no coincidence why retailers use the type of lighting and the level of illumination in their shops. As this interior design expert, Jasmin McManamy, puts it, “Lighting sells your product for you and helps to tell your story.”

Jasmin: The audience will learn about what type of lighting and levels of illumination fit their brand and aesthetic. They will also learn about what things to avoid in lighting, and gain an understanding on how lighting impacts their customers’ mood and behavior.

This is your first time presenting at our Theater. What are you looking forward to most from speaking at the Innovation Theater?

Jasmin: I am looking forward to hearing how others have told their story in the design of their product or the merchandising of their store. We will also look forward to a question and answer session.

Mobolaji: I am honored to be presenting with Jasmin. I am looking to meeting the audience and answering brand questions.

Thank you, Jasmin and Mobolaji. This is sure to be an “enlightening” presentation! We look forward to seeing your perspectives on retail design, branding and how interiors impact shoppers. Be sure to attend Shine the Light on Your Brand: Retail Design at the Innovation Theater, Lakeside Center room e350, Tuesday, March 10 at 10:30 a.m.

Learn more about Jasmin and Mobolaji at:

JasminReese_LOGO-RoundFINAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jasmin Marie, Allied ASID

Interior Design Principal

Jasmin Reese Interiors

612 W. Wrightwood Ave

Chicago, IL 60614

312-607-5057

www.jasminreeseinteriors.com

mobolaji logo

 

 

 

Mobolaji Akintunde

mobolaji@mobolaji.co.uk

http://www.mobolaji.co.uk

www.stacheandhyde.com

Inspiring Innovation: An Interview with Adrienne Weiss, Adrienne Weiss Corporation

February 18th, 2015

By Vicki Matranga, Design Programs Coordinator

Learn how to develop and launch the right products for the right customer—with the right methods! Be sure to attend some of the free executive-level educational sessions at the Innovation Theater. These programs will give you a fresh perspective as you walk the Show and will inspire, inform and improve your business.

The four days of the 2015 International Home + Housewares Show will be packed with events and educational sessions. To help you plan your valuable time at the Show, we preview the 21 presentations that will take place in the Innovation Theater in the Lakeside Center. Don’t miss the chance to meet the speakers in person and the opportunity to ask questions relevant to your work. All programs are audio-recorded and will be available on www.housewares.org after the Show.

Make It a BRAND New Day: Mastering the Three Rules of Branding

Saturday March 7 2:30—3:20 p.m.

Innovation Theater, Lakeside Center, Room E350Adrienne Weiss Headshot_Feb2015

Adrienne Weiss is the principle of the Adrienne Weiss Corporation (AWC) and has been called “the high priestess of pop marketing.” Since 1986, AWC has developed award-winning brand strategies for companies in many industries – food and beverage, retail, consumer products, convenience stores, real estate developments, sports stadiums and entertainment concepts. From Coca-Cola, McDonald’s and Build-A-Bear to Target Stores, Five Below and Disney, Adrienne and her team create and reimagine brands that impact businesses all over the globe.

As an international speaker on branding, Adrienne has addressed a wide variety of audiences including the National Restaurant Association Show, the National Association of Convenience Stores, the International Shopping Center Convention, as well as entrepreneurial classes at Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management and the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. Her talks enlighten retailers and manufacturers on how to create “brand genetics” and how to deploy them and make stronger connections with consumers.

Prior to the founding of AWC, Adrienne was a vice president of Applause, Inc., where she helped expand the Smurf’s brand to over $1 billion in revenue. After her successful tenure at Applause, Inc., Adrienne became the president of Rage, Inc., a gift manufacturing business. Adrienne received her BFA from Syracuse University and did graduate work at American University. She has served on the boards of the School of the Art Institute, the Gene Siskel Film Center, Common Threads and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Chicago. She is presently on the board of Metropolitan Family Services.

Adrienne, what is the most interesting/exciting part of your job?

Our work as brand navigators is to merge right and left brain points of view–we see opportunity when creativity and emotion intersect with real-life business strategies and solutions. Balancing story-telling and emotional resonance with quantitative realities is what excites us. We are in the position of seeing the trends and the competitive landscape. When we work with our clients, we love being the “innocent eyes” that challenge and push existing notions of a brand to see how it can flex and evolve for today’s marketplace.

What has changed most in your business? How has your company responded to these challenges?

As with most businesses today, you can not underestimate the power of social media and being responsive in the digital space. Your brand is more than a strident adoption of a style guide or the militant use of a logo or tagline. Rather, a brand must respond to existing and potential customers on so many levels and in so many mediums. It is about engaging others in a meaningful conversation and being many things to many people. Not to mention that the voice you put out there in the world must be authentic, nimble and always relevant. When we develop and refine brands, we work closely with our client to see how that brand voice speaks true in the ever-changing digital space. We want to make sure that the twitter feed, Facebook post or picture shared online is pushed through that brand’s filter and shares the same creative DNA.

Why did you choose to speak at our Show?

The home and housewares industry has become one of the most fashion-driven, trend-focused market segments. The demand for story-driven concepts and brands that resonate with customers is growing as shelf space diminishes and competition grows. A strong brand voice is essential to thrive in this commercial landscape.

What will you be speaking about?

Our presentation is about the importance of branding and how anyone can breathe new life into any brand with our headlines and strategies. So many times the essential story of a business is left up to interpretation by customers, employees and vendors. Identifying the emotional aspects of a business and putting words and pictures to it allows everyone experiencing your brand to understand it in the same way. The hero stories are the ones that are inclusive. They speak to everyone and people can understand the story in their own way.

What are you looking forward to most from speaking at the Show?

Participants at this Show know this market space very well, and there is so much creative work and thought in this industry. We love speaking to an audience that is dynamic, thinking critically and creatively. We are looking forward to an interactive and exciting conversation with the audience that appreciates entrepreneurial thought and market disruption.

What are consumers’ biggest concerns regarding housewares products?

Competition is ever-present so staying ahead of the curve and being trend-right in this industry is so important. Responding to fashion, colors and technology is a must for companies that want to stay relevant to today’s consumer. There is so much noise and distraction these days, it is critical for a brand to have a clear vision and engaging voice that cuts through the clutter. When we develop a brand voice, we ask “How does this fit into the cultural landscape?” Being mindful of those influencers enables us to develop a brand narrative that is current, credible and responsive.

Thank you, Adrienne, for outlining your perspective on branding. Your program is sure to be a draw for our Show audiences, because your creative spark has envisioned the distinctive branding and memorable appearance of the International Home + Housewares Show for more than a decade. We look forward to learning from your insights on Saturday, March 7 at 2:30 p.m. in the Innovation Theater.

AWC Logo

 

 

 

 

To learn more about Adrienne’s work, visit www.aweisscorp.com

Contact Keren Weiss at kweiss@aweisscorp.com

Inspiring Innovation: A Conversation with Joanne Domeniconi, The Grommet, Abigail Kiefer, Red Clay, Kate Drane, Indiegogo, and Lisa Q. Fetterman, Nomiku

February 18th, 2015

By Vicki Matranga, Design Programs Coordinator

Learn how to develop and launch the right products for the right customer—with the right methods! Be sure to attend some of the free executive-level educational sessions at the Innovation Theater. These programs will give you a new perspective as you walk the Show and will inspire, inform and improve your business.

The four days of the 2015 International Home + Housewares Show will be packed with events and educational sessions. To help you plan your valuable time at the Show, we preview the 21 presentations that will take place in the Innovation Theater in the Lakeside Center. Don’t miss the chance to meet the speakers in person and for the opportunity to ask questions relevant to your work. All programs are audio-recorded and will be available on www.housewares.org after the Show.

The Maker Movement: The Next Industrial Revolution?

Sunday, March 8 9:30—10:20 a.m.

Innovation Theater, Lakeside Center, Room E350

Get acquainted with a quartet of dynamic women who are at the forefront of the Maker Movement: Joanne Domeniconi, co-founder of The Grommet, will moderate the discussion with Abigail Kiefer, co-founder and CEO of Red Clay; Kate Drane, head of design, tech and hardware at Indiegogo; and Lisa Q. Fetterman, creator of the Nomiku sous vide immersion circulator.

Joanne D portraitjpgJoanne Domeniconi is the co-founder and chief discovery officer of The Grommet, a product launch platform and the first curated, online commerce platform for both B2C and B2B discovery and sales of consumer products created by Maker entrepreneurs. The Grommet, founded in 2008 in the Boston area, is rewriting the playbook for product launch and reshaping how people discover, share, influence and buy products online. The Grommet hosts a special exhibitor area in the Show’s North Building concourse.

 

 

AKiefer_RedClay_Photo (resize)CEO Abigail Kiefer co-founded Red Clay in 2011 with Ashley Etling to help retail companies build exceptional products in less time and to make the design process enjoyable again. As Red Clay’s chief relationship builder and risk-taker, Abigail is responsible for creating partnerships with Walmart, Dillard’s and other Fortune 50 retail and consumer package goods companies. A former urban planner for the city of San Francisco, she built her deep understanding of retail by moving to Bentonville, Ark. (home of Walmart) for two years and immersing herself in the industry that sprang up around the retail giant. Kiefer earned an MA in urban planning and policy from the University of Illinois at Chicago and a dual BA in urban and regional studies, environmental planning and policy, and Spanish at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Kate Drane Headshot 11.9.14 (resize)Kate Drane is Indiegogo’s senior director of Chicago outreach and head of design, tech and hardware. She has led many companies, including Misfit Wearables, Scanadu, Skully and Canonical, to secure funding on Indiegogo. In addition to working at Indiegogo, Kate is the co-founder and CMO of The Can Van, the world’s first mobile beer canning service made to bring reasonably priced and environmentally friendly packaging options to California breweries. She met her co-founders while attending Presidio Graduate School, where she received her MBA in sustainable management.

 

Lisa Fetterman 1 (resize)Lisa Q. Fetterman is the founder and CEO of Nomiku, the first home sous vide immersion circulator. She was recently named Forbes 30 Under 30. Lisa’s culinary sensibilities were honed at some of the best restaurants in the world such Babbo, Jean Georges, and Saison. Her sophisticated writing and editing background includes a BA in journalism from New York University’s Arthur L. Carter of Journalism. She has worked for Hearst Corporation in its digital media department and has helped publish multiple New York Times bestsellers with SMITH Magazine. With her two partners, husband Abe Fetterman (who has a PhD in astrophysics) and industrial designer and chef Wipop Bam Suppipat, the trio launched their sous vide immersion circulator in 2012 on Kickstarter. Their instant success tripled their $200,000 goal, allowing them to begin production and establish their company in San Francisco. Lisa will be at Nomiku’s booth in the Lakeside Center Wired + Well Expo.

What is the most exciting or rewarding part of your work? What inspires your passion?

Joanne: I’m inspired by clever, disruptive, courageous or problem solving ideas. I also like getting to know the story of the product and the people behind it.

Kate: My job is amazing! I get to help empower people to fund their dreams. Everyday is different because I focus on helping people as they develop their go-to-market plans.

Abigail: I believe that Red Clay is changing how the retail industry thinks about product design. Knowing that I’m playing a key role in this movement toward more efficient, innovative and exquisite product design is really what helps me get out of bed in the morning or crack open my laptop at home after a long day in the office. Traditionally, it takes about 18 months for a retail company to bring a new product to market, and a lot of that time is in the design phase. Nowadays, retail companies know they need to build better, more differentiated products in order to draw consumers who are holding their hard-earned dollars more closely and less likely to be loyal to a single brand. The brands that work with us have embraced the idea that having more, high-quality ideas leads to a better product. On top of that, they’re finding that using our platform to manage these projects saves them a lot of time. A typical project for us takes about three months — more than 80% shorter than the typical production cycle.

As a former urban planner, it’s in my blood to believe that bringing the right people together leads to great things. It’s pretty exciting to know that we’re creating a win-win situation for retailers, who are able to build a better product more quickly, and for designers, who are able to land high-impact work and get compensated fairly for it.

Lisa: The most rewarding part of my work is seeing that people cook the most delicious meal of their lives and share that with their friends and family! I love making a product that helps people become the innovators and creators they were born to be. I am so inspired by people who make things, whether it’s 3D printers, dresses or food.

In the past few years, what has changed most in your business? How has your company met these challenges in the way you do your work?

Joanne: We’re optimistic about the trends that we see and our business alignment with those trends. Our mission is rooted in the philosophy of Citizen Commerce, a movement that promotes product purchases that express powerful contemporary values around sustainability, quality, technology and social enterprise.

Kate: Indiegogo launched the crowdfunding industry in January 2008. Since then, the industry has experienced significant growth. In all, crowdfunding platforms have raised some $2.7 billion and successfully funded more than a million campaigns in 2012, according to a Massolution report, with an 81% increase to $5.1 billion in 2013. By 2025, the global crowdfunding market could reach between $90 billion and $96 billion — roughly 1.8 times the size of the global venture capital industry today, according to a 2013 study commissioned by the World Bank.

Abigail: Red Clay actually started out as a brand of sustainable home decor products manufactured in the United States. We thought the best way to build our brand was to bring the right people together to develop the designs, have the public vote on the designs they liked and then bring those designs to the market. At the time, there weren’t many home decor items that were both sustainable and beautiful, and we believed we were filling a void in the market. We built the online platform to make the design and voting process possible, got great placements in some of the biggest trade shows in the country, but found manufacturing and sales distribution incredibly difficult.

We met a lot of people at these trade shows, and we realized that they were really drawn to the idea of connecting the right people to simplify the design process and make it more efficient. No one was doing that. That was about three years ago. We took a good look at the marketplace, a good look in the mirror, and decided it was time to pivot. We dropped the idea of making and selling our own products and became a technology platform that connects brands to industrial and graphic designers. We’ve really honed our product — a combination of talent pool and design process and management tool — allowing designers and brands to easily go from idea to manufacture-ready drawings in a matter of weeks instead of months. Our clients tell us that Red Clay is making design fun again!

Lisa: So much has changed… but mostly our customer. We made Nomiku from the ground up to be a tool for the home cook but many high-end restaurants rely on it every day. Noma used over 12 of our machines during their stint in Japan. Saison uses it here in San Francisco. Alta makes their cocktails with a Nomiku. It is definitely a different experience to interact with my heroes and I am loving every moment of the challenge of meeting their expectations.

Why did you choose to speak at the International Home + Housewares Show?

Joanne: The Maker Movement is facilitating all sorts of innovation by empowering small business and independent entrepreneurs to create, innovate and succeed. It’s this movement that is fueling the growth in our business and we are always happy to have opportunities, like speaking at this Show, to share what we are witnessing and learning.

Kate: The home is evolving and getting smarter. We have seen so many incredible products developed through our platform, including Canary, an amazing home security device, to Dolfi, the next generation washing machine. People want to make their homes better, and it’s amazing to see entrepreneurs creating products to do just that.

Abigail: Speaking at this Show is a very big deal for Red Clay, and I am thrilled. This Show attracts such incredible brands and smart minds in the industry. It’s an opportunity to see new products from around the world and to learn from all of these great companies and thought leaders. I’m a total extrovert, so shows are always fun for me. Many of our current customers will attend, as well as many of the brands we would love to meet. I know there’s something to learn from everyone at this conference, so it’s a huge honor to have a platform among such a distinguished group of presenters and such an influential audience.

Lisa: I think my business is not housewares as usual. My company uses different technologies—for instance, my heater is actually a semi-conductor. I also don’t know of many appliances that cross-pollinate technological disciplines and use the newer sources of financing.

Tell us what you will be speaking about and how and this topic is important for Show audiences.

Joanne: The Maker Movement is empowering independent people to create, fund, manufacture, distribute and sell their own goods. There is a huge shift in the way that products come to market. Everyone should know about and understand the new technology platforms that are democratizing access to information, capital and customers.

Kate: I’ll be speaking about how the Maker movement is changing the landscape. It’s no longer just big companies bringing products to life. Now, thanks to crowdfunding, your next door neighbor might just create the next big thing.

Abigail: We’re sharing the stage with some of our friends involved in the crowdsourcing world — Joanne at The Grommet, Kate from Indiegogo and Lisa of Nomiku—to help people in the home decor world better understand how harnessing the power of the crowd can lead to incredible results. I’m a firm believer that many minds and ideas are better than one. We hope the Show audience will walk away from our presentation with a better sense of how and why crowdsourcing can be a game changer for their businesses, plus different ways to maximize efficiency and manage a project that involves outside players.

Lisa: I’ll be speaking about the only thing I know, my experience in crowdfunding!

What are you looking forward to most from speaking at the Innovation Theater?

Abigail: Aside from the potential opportunity to meet my fangirl crush Ree Drummond (the Pioneer Woman), I’m excited for the opportunity to talk about our particular brand of crowdsourcing — I like to call it crowdsourcing 2.0. Red Clay is at the forefront of a huge shift in how retailers do their product design and development, and I believe our platform provides a real value-add in terms of managing projects with external partners and making product development efficient and enjoyable.

Lisa: I hope that some people will come up to me afterwards and we’ll become friends.

What do you see as consumers’ biggest concerns regarding housewares products?

Abigail: In this increasingly busy world, I think products that offer functionality and simplicity along with beauty will go furthest with consumers. I don’t think consumers necessarily want more stuff. I think they want stuff that will make their daily lives as simple as possible so that they have time for the things that really matter — time with friends and family, and time to do things they actually enjoy doing.

Lisa: That they are getting the best, of course!

What are some of today’s trends or issues that new product development professionals and/or retailers face in the housewares market?

Kate: Connected home is HUGE! We see this as a space that will continue to grow as people better understand the needs of the market and push what is possible. The sky is the limit to what you can create.

Abigail: Much has been written about retail’s “omni-channel” future, but there has been little coverage on the tremendous pressure big, traditional retailers are under to make better and more differentiated products faster in order to compete with the myriad options available through online retailers like Amazon. Retailers really have to work hard to win consumer dollars. There’s a strong link between all the stories you read about the middle class feeling squeezed due to the economy and the stories about dead and dying shopping malls. The majority of Americans have less money to throw around than they did 10 or 15 years ago, and they’re going to hold out for the right product and the right customer experience. They’re going to hold out for products that make their lives easier so they can focus on the things that really matter to them. In this day and age, creating more relevant products in a timely way holds the key to winning consumers over.

As for product development professionals, we’re seeing some really big companies with long-held traditions of how to do product development become open to innovation and change. As expectations for design quality rise in the industry overall, we think there will be increased opportunities for independent designers to work with big brands, and there will be more pressure on product development folks inside established companies to find fresh talent and ideas.

Lisa: I think a cool trend is rapid prototyping in the United States. I’ve written a bit about it for MAKE magazine.

Thank you, Joanne, Kate and Abigail! This is sure to be an exciting discussion. The Theater might barely contain the energy forces emanating from the four of you. You will inspire the audience for Sunday’s first program. We look forward to learning from your experiences at the front of industrial revolution in the Innovation Theater on Sunday, March 8 at 9:30.

Grommet logo

 

 

 

 

 

Joanne Domeniconi

Co-Founder, The Grommet

www.thegrommet.com

@jdomeniconi

joanne@thegrommet.com

 

Indiegogo logo magenta

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kate Drane

Indiegogo

kated@indiegogo.com

www.indiegogo.com

 

Red Clay logo 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abigail Kiefer

Red Clay

415-205-7137

www.redclaydesign.com

 

NomikuLogo_080614

 

 

 

To learn about Lisa Fetterman’s journey in forming Nomiku and launching its sous vide immersion circulator visit booth L11061 in the Lakeside Center Wired + Well expo and view this video.

Discover Design Sells Out With More than 100 Exhibitors of High-Design for the Home and Kitchen

February 12th, 2015

Discover Design, a destination for buyers seeking unique products from high-design and innovative companies, is sold-out for the 2015 International Home + Housewares Show. Discover Design is a juried category and located in the Dine + Design Expo in the South Building.

Among the 100+ exhibitors in the category, buyers will discover new companies including Bengt Ek Design,  Deejo, Gramovox,  iittala, Jia, PO: Selected, Pomegranate, Poppin, Rice Cube, Vasta International and Prestige Identity featuring the brands Cookut, Lina Forlino, Philippi, OA1710, Welton of London and Fire Design.

Returning exhibitors include Alessi, Black + Blum, Blomus, David Rasmussen Design, Dreamfarm, Eva Solo, French Bull, Guzzini, Infusion Living, Joseph Joseph, Inc., Parallax Horizon, Sempli, Robert Welch, Three by Three, Yamazaki and Zoku LLC.

Design Debut, the Show’s design incubator program located within Discover Design, will host 10 new-to-the-Show exhibitors who will bring their special brand of innovation to the buyer audience at the International Home + Housewares Show. Participating this year are Belle V, Bob’s Your Uncle, Latimeria, Milimetrado, Nero Designs, NP Glassworks, Perry Gargano, SoYoung, Strand Design and Steelforme.

Other events planned for Discover Design include:

  • A Discover Design Gallery showcasing products competing for Global Innovation Award (gia). The gallery, located in Booth S3283, is open to registered buyers and media.
  • An invitation-only Discover Design Specialty Retailer & Media Reception at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 7, in the Gallery where buyers and media can mingle with the exhibitors and their designers.

Once again, Discover Design companies are eligible to compete for a Global Innovation Award (gia) for product innovation and booth design. Each company can submit two new products and one collection for consideration for a gia award. The 11 winners will be announced at the invitation-only gia dinner on Sunday, March 8, held at the Radisson Blu Chicago.

The 2015 International Home + Housewares Show features more than 2,100 exhibitors from 49 countries and attracts more than 60,000 attendees. The Show opens at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 7 and closes at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, March 10.  Buyers and news media can begin their Show early on Saturday with the New Exhibitor Preview from 8:30 to 10 a.m. in Room S100/Grand Ballroom, just inside the front door of McCormick Place. Sixty first-time exhibitor from all Show categories will be on display. To register for a Show badge or for more information, please visit www.housewares.org.

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